spinning

Gripping Yarn Spindles


My two new spindles from Lisa arrived this week – so I now have a total of three Gripping Yarn spindles. Here’s a nice family shot:

Gripping Yarn Spindles

On the right, you can see my Black Palm Rose – my two new spindles are, in the middle, another Rose, made from Cherry this time and on the left, a Birds Eye Maple Russian. I wanted to get a Russian, so I can try truly “spinning off the tip” which is harder to do with a French style spindle with the wider tip. I also wanted to get a much lighter Rose, so I can use it handheld for twiddling and making lofty, thick singles in the French style. It also gave me an opportunity to purchase one of Lisa’s copper caps, so that you can also use the spindle suspended.

Time for some pics.

Gripping Yarn Rose in Cherry

Gripping Yarn Rose in Cherry

Gripping Yarn Rose in Cherry

This Cherry spindle weighs only 19g – so it’s super light. I was hoping to get one in African Mahogany, which is slightly lighter, but the spindles didn’t come out balanced – and the Cherry is beautiful.

You can see the copper cap – it weighs about 6g and is malleable enough so that I can tweak the end if needs be.

Gripping Yarn Russian in Birds Eye Maple

Gripping Yarn Russian in Birds Eye Maple

The Birdseye Maple Russian weighs 30g – I’m hoping that with this I might be able to get to grips with the simultaneous spinning and drafting technique that I’ve attempted. I’m getting to be pretty decent at long-draw via park-and-draft, so it would be nice to add another technique to the arsenal. The wood has a beautiful grain – with maple stripes, as well as the little birds eye knots. This was my surprise spindle – I asked Lisa to make me a Russian out of a blonde wood and this is what she came up with. It’s gorgeous and so well balanced.

Gripping Yarn Rose in Black Palm

Gripping Yarn Rose in Black Palm

Gripping Yarn Rose in Black Palm

And my Black Palm Rose. It’s actually quite a bit shorter than the other Rose – and weighs 34g – it’s been a lovely starter spindle and does spin beautifully.

I don’t think I’d want to spin everything supported – for me it’s still a little slower than suspended spinning and for things like sock yarn, I’d want to be able to spin a worsted-style yarn. So my other spindles will get plenty of use. But certain fibres in my stash were made to be spun this way. Camel, cashmere, angora… I have a couple of 100g merino/angora 50/50 braids that I can’t wait to spin up into something lofty and soft.

Time to get off and practice! ๐Ÿ™‚

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