travelling

Malham


As previously promised, it’s time for me to tell you a little bit about our trip to the Yorkshire Dales last weekend. This weekend however, we find ourselves down south in Woking and Horsham attending the wedding bash of the lovely Ruth from Rockandpurl to her new husband Brian.

This time last week, we were on our way home having done a nice bit of sightseeing. I’ll break it up in to two parts as it would be a bit much all in one go.

First up is the trip we made out on Saturday. We were headed for Malham and on the way drove past the lovely little village of Burnsall:

The View over Burnsall

As we climbed higher into the hills we hit some fog coming down:

Driving to Malham

We parked the car and off we started walking to Malham Cove and the limestone pavement. I love the photos we took as we were walking and got closer and closer:

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

There’s a lovely river that flows down the valley that comes directly down from the cove:

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

You can climb to the top of the pavement using a path made of steps. MANY steps. Probably best not to ask me how many breaks I needed on the way up as it felt like my lungs were going to explode. A couple of inhaler puffs didn’t quite do it but it gave the opportunity to take some pictures of the awesome view:

Malham Cove

Eventually we got to the top – didn’t help that I was a bit wobbly on my feet and it was a tad damp, which made negotiating the pavement, FUN!

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

You get a great view down the valley from the top:

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

Fog started to roll in, which makes it super atmospheric, but damper still.

Malham Cove

There are some mad crazy people who love to walk down to the very edge of the pavement and sit on the end. As much as I love heights and adrenaline, I prefer not to endanger my life in this manner. I would rather jump out of a plane, but that’s a whole other kettle of fish.

Malham Cove

The nature of the pavement makes it possible for tiny little microclimates to exist – which means that between the gaps in the stones you can see ferns and other plants that you would normally expect to see in much warmer and more humid climbs:

Malham Cove

Once we got back to the bottom (although climbing down all those steps strains a completely different set of muscles!) we were able to see people scaling their way up the sheer chalk face. It’s a very popular climbing spot – although I imagine making your way past the overhang at the very top is extremely hard!

Malham Cove

Malham Cove

The history behind the area is interesting. There used to be a giant glacier which carved out the landscape and shaped most of what we see today. The Wikipedia article is quite interesting and the BBC did a section on it in a recent episode of The Great British Countryside. It was nice to be able to take Trev to somewhere that he’d seen on TV only a couple of weeks before, although he confesses that he would probably have preferred to crawl along the pavement, rather than walk as he felt a bit more secure!

Really nice to be out and about in what is an area relatively local to us. It’s amazing how far into Yorkshire we can get on buses etc – while having a car helps, it will do us good to get more familiar with what’s available on public transport and make more of an effort to go and see stuff!

Next up will be some trees and waterfalls (well waterfall)…

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